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There’s not even an “Acting” Director of the Bureau of Land Management: Brian Steed is just “Exercising Authority of the Director”

Originally posted on Straight from the Horse's Heart:
The Bureau of Land Management doesn’t have a Director or an Acting Director.  Brian Steed is the Deputy Director, Policy & Programs, but he is “Exercising Authority of the Director.”  There are 8 “Acting” Directors under him. Source:  BLM DEPUTY DIRECTOR, POLICY & PROGRAMS    Brian Steed Deputy Director, Policy and Programs, Bureau of Land Management Exercising Authority of the Director Brian Steed is the BLM’s Deputy Director for Policy and Programs, exercising authority of the director. Before joining the BLM in October 2017, Steed served as Chief of Staff for Representative Chris Stewart of Utah. Before that, he taught economics at Utah State University and was once a deputy county attorney in Iron County, Utah. He is a native of Logan, Utah, and attended Utah State University, earning both a B.A. and M.A. in political science. He also earned his law degree at the University of Utah, with a Certificate in Natural Resources and Environmental Law.  Steed then earned his doctorate in Public Policy from Indiana University in 2010. Read the full biography ACTING DEPUTY DIRECTOR, OPERATIONS    Richard Cardinale Acting Deputy Director, Operations Richard T. Cardinale is detailed to the position of Deputy Director – Operations, Bureau of Land Management since June 11, 2018.  Rich has been serving as the Director of Business Operations in the Office of the Chief Information Officer since December 1, 2017.   Read the full biography. ALASKA…

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Ecosystem Services: Think of bees that pollinate more than 90 commercial crops in the U.S….

Originally posted on Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin:
…That’s the beauty, or bounty, that the Endangered Species Act provides. The ESA ensures these beneficial ecosystems just don’t unravel. You see the Endangered Species Act doesn’t just protect the individual species, it also protects the lands, or habitats, the endangered species need to survive. For sure protecting these habitats can make…

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The Media’s Failure to Connect the Dots on Climate Change

Originally posted on The Secular Jurist:
Why are some major news outlets still covering extreme weather like it’s an act of God? By Emily Atkin July 25, 2018 A record-breaking heat wave killed 65 people in Japan this week, just weeks after record flooding there killed more than 200. Record-breaking heat is also wreaking havoc in California, where the wildfire season is already worse than usual. In Greece, fast-moving fires have killed at least 80 people, and Sweden is struggling to contain more than 50 fires amid its worst drought in 74 years. Both countries have experienced all-time record-breaking temperatures this summer, as has most of the rest of the world. Is this climate change, or merely Mother Nature? The science is clear: Heat-trapping greenhouse gases have artificially increased the average temperature across the globe, making extreme heat events more likely. This has also increased the risk of frequent and more devastating wildfires, as prolonged heat dries soil and turns vegetation into tinder. And yet, despite these facts, there’s no climate connection to be found in much news coverage of extreme weather events across the globe—even in historically climate-conscious outlets like NPR and The New York Times. These omissions, critics say, can affect how Americans view global warming and its impact on their lives. Continue reading:  The Media’s Failure to Connect the Dots on Climate Change

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