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Indigenous pipeline protesters take over B.C. park, displace campers

Originally posted on RED POWER MEDIA:
An Indigenous group calling itself the Tiny House Warriors has moved into the North Thompson River Provincial Park near Clearwater, B.C., in an effort to block the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. Group spokeswoman Kanahus Manuel says they are reclaiming an ancestral village their people were forced from many years ago, while at the same…

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Wilderness, Massive Infrastructure Projects & Changing Global Norms

Originally posted on La Paz Group:
Construction of the second phase of the Chinese-financed Standard Gauge Railway in Kenya crosses through Nairobi National Park, as pictured here in June. YASUYOSHI CHIBA/ AFP/ GETTY IMAGES Thanks to William Laurance for this informative opinion essay that gives a bit of hope for wilderness preservation: Is the Global Era of Massive Infrastructure Projects Coming…

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BLM to start “emergency” removal of wild horses in Pancake HMA, while privately owned livestock slurp up the resources

Originally posted on Straight from the Horse's Heart:
THERE WOULD LIKELY BE WATER FOR WILD HORSES ON THIS HMA IF PRIVATELY OWNED LIVESTOCK WEREN’T USING IT UP.  In the BLM Press release below, the BLM states “With a current population of approximately 2,160 wild horses, valuable resources have been depleted, affecting the health of those animals.”  So, before reading…

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Patricia Randolph’s Madravenspeak: Federal judge slams USDA’s wildlife-killing agency

Originally posted on Wolves of Douglas County Wisconsin:
“Beef, it’s what’s for dinner. With a large side of wildlife slaughter.” ~ Madravenspeak column, “Federal Wildlife Services Program Serves Up Poison” “Jane Goodall gave the documentary about (U.S. Department of Agriculture’s) Wildlife Services, “EXPOSED,” rave reviews and wants millions to see it,” according to the website Predator Defense. “(W)histle-blowers go on the…

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Action Alert! Please Help Sand Wash Basin Wild Horses by Commenting on Roundup Plan and Demanding Water for the Horses

Originally posted on Straight from the Horse's Heart:
Source:  wildhoofbeats.com Water is life, especially for nursing mothers by Carol J. Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation The BLM has produced a Determination of NEPA Adequacy instead of an Environmental Assessment for the Sand Wash Basin Herd Management Area and this is a plan that will…

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Young gorillas are working together to destroy poachers’ traps in Rwanda

Originally posted on Exposing the Big Game:
https://matadornetwork.com/read/young-gorillas-working-together-destroy-poachers-traps-rwanda/ Photo: Marian Golovic/Shutterstock Eben Diskin Jun 5, 2018 28,178 WE ALREADY KNOW that humans and gorillas are very alike, but we’ve always believed we could outsmart our distant simian cousins. Poachers, in particular, have tried taking advantage of our cognitive supremacy to trick gorillas, luring them into noose-like traps. But it seems like the gorillas can still outsmart them, thanks to the power of teamwork. Young gorillas living in the Rwanda National Park have reportedly learned how to foil hunters and poachers, working together to dismantle the traps set for them. While older gorillas are usually powerful enough to free themselves, younger ones aren’t so fortunate. Traps usually work by tying a noose to a branch of bamboo stalk, and bending it to the ground, with another stick or rock holding it in place. When triggered, the noose tightens around the animal, even hoisting it into the air if the animal is light enough. Gorillas, however, are taking a proactive approach to these traps. A research teamin Rwanda recently found groups of young gorillas actively seeking out and dismantling traps, to prevent their brethren from falling victim. The research team observed one gorilla bending and breaking the tree, while another disabled the noose, repeating the process for multiple traps. The team believes that gorillas have witnessed a correlation between these devices and the deaths of their peers, prompting their desire to neutralize them. Chris Tyler-Smith, a geneticist at the…

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Barents Sea seems to have crossed a climate tipping point

Originally posted on Exposing the Big Game:
This is probably what a climate tipping point looks like—and we’re past it. JOHN TIMMER – 6/26/2018, 4:00 AM https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/06/barents-sea-seems-to-have-crossed-a-climate-tipping-point/ Enlarge / A cloud-covered Barents Sea, showing sea ice encroaching from the Arctic Ocean to the north. NASA Aqua-MODIS 182 Many of the threats we know are associated with climate change are slow moving. Gradually rising seas, a steady uptick in extreme weather events, and more all mean that change will come gradually to much of the globe. But we also recognize that there can be tipping points, where certain aspects of our climate system shift suddenly to new behaviors. The challenge with tipping points is that they’re often easiest to identify in retrospect. We have some indications that our climate has experienced them in the past, but reconstructing how quickly a system tipped over or the forces that drove the change can be difficult. Now, a team of Norwegian scientists is suggesting it has watched the climate reach a tipping point: the loss of Arctic sea ice has flipped the Barents Sea from acting as a buffer between the Atlantic and Arctic oceans to something closer to an arm of the Atlantic. Decades of data The Norwegian work doesn’t rely on any new breakthrough in technology. Instead, it’s built on the longterm collection of data. The Barents Sea has been monitored for things like temperature, ice cover, and salinity, in some cases extending back over 50…

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