Migratory birds and Asian, African and European children

Originally posted on Dear Kitty. Some blog:
This video says about itself: 9 Jan 2014 Spring Alive has been spreading widely in Africa. Check how great they are doing in Nigeria where many children are enthusiastically engaged in birds oriented actions thanks to the Spring Alive project. From BirdLife: Spring Alive 2014 has arrived! By Rebecca Langer, Thu, 06/03/2014 – 15:14 BirdLife and its Partners in 50 countries are proud to announce the launch of Spring Alive 2014. Now nine years old, Spring Alive brings together children, their teachers and families in Europe, Central Asia and Africa to observe and record the arrivals of five species of migrant birds:  Barn Swallow Hirundo rustica, White Stork Ciconia ciconia, Common Cuckoo Cuculus canorus, Common Swift Apus apus, and European Bee-eater Merops apiaster. Spring Alive 2013 broke all previous records. During Eurasian and African seasons, a total of over 286,000 observations of migratory birds were recorded on the Spring Alive website, and by the end of the year over 54,000 children, 900 teachers and supervisors and 500 volunteers from 49 countries had joined in a range of Spring Alive activities. While the program began as a pan-European project to track the northward spread of spring migrants, now it involves many more indoor and outdoor events to engage children, schools and the wider community in the conservation of migratory birds. One example is the new pilot program Spring Twin, which matches schools in Europe…

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Feathered polar dinosaurs discovery in Australia

Originally posted on Dear Kitty. Some blog:
https://youtu.be/aOeFRg_1_Yg This 2017 video says about itself: Over the past 20 years, dinosaurs of all types and sizes have been found with some sort of fluff or even full-on plumage. These fuzzy discoveries have raised a whole batch of new questions so we’re here to tell you everything we know about dinosaurs and feathers. From Uppsala University in Sweden: First evidence of feathered polar dinosaurs found in Australia November 12, 2019 A cache of 118 million-year-old fossilized dinosaur and bird feathers has been recovered from an ancient lake deposit that once lay beyond the southern polar circle. Feathered dinosaur fossils are famous, but known from a handful of localities worldwide. Examples from the Southern Hemisphere are especially rare, and mainly include only isolated feathers. An international team of scientists has analyzed a collection of 10 such fossil feathers found in Australia, which reveal an unexpected diversity of tufted hair-like ‘proto-feathers’ from meat-eating dinosaurs, together with downy body feathers, and wing feathers from primitive birds that would have been used for flight. Uniquely, the fossil feathers from Australia were all entombed in fine muddy sediments that accumulated at the bottom of a shallow lake close to the South Pole during the Age of Dinosaurs. “Dinosaur skeletons and even the fragile bones of early birds have been found at ancient high-latitudes before. Yet, to date, no directly attributable integumentary remains have been discovered to show…

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North America Has Lost 3 Billion Birds, Scientists Say

Originally posted on Exposing the Big Game:
LISTEN·2:522:52PLAYLIST DOWNLOAD EMBED ” /> Facebook Twitter Flipboard Email September 19, 20192:01 PM ET Heard on All Things Considered NELL GREENFIELDBOYCE Migrating shorebirds at Kimbles Beach, N.J. Researchers estimate that the population of North American shorebirds alone has fallen by more than a third since 1970. Jacqueline Larma/AP https://www.npr.org/2019/09/19/762090471/north-america-has-lost-3-billion-birds-scientists-say Over the past half-century, North America has lost more than a quarter of its entire bird population, or around 3 billion birds. That’s according to a new estimate published in the journal Science by researchers who brought together a variety of information that has been collected on 529 bird species since 1970. “We saw this tremendous net loss across the entire bird community,” says Ken Rosenberg, an applied conservation scientist at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology in Ithaca, N.Y. “By our estimates, it’s a 30% loss in the total number of breeding birds.” Rosenberg and his colleagues already knew that a number of bird populations had been decreasing. “But we also knew that other bird populations were increasing,” he says. “And what we didn’t know is whether there was a net change.” Scientists thought there might simply be a shift in the total bird population toward more generalist birds adapted to living around humans. To find out, the researchers collected data from long-running surveys conducted with the help of volunteer bird spotters, such as the North American Breeding Bird Survey and the Audubon Christmas Bird Count. They combined that data with a decade’s worth of…

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Here’s How North Carolina’s Wild Horses Have Survived Hurricanes

Originally posted on Straight from the Horse's Heart:
by Kareena Koirala as published on AmoMama.com Hurricane Dorian struck with tragic devastation. However, the majestic breed of wild horses living in North Carolina’s Outer Banks used their natural defenses against the storm. According to Corolla Wild Horse Fund, which looks after the herd of wild horses in the area, the…

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