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St. George & Zion Nat. Park Utah 4/13/18

Originally posted on Natural History Wanderings:
submitted by Ter Sullivan It’s early spring at the 3000-ft elevation of the fastest growing town in the state, where desert marigold and apricot mallow are reaching their full bloom. Snow Canyon State Park ($6) is a must-see if you go in the next two weeks. You’ll receive a detailed full-color trail map with your paid admission. Even if you’re not a hiker, the spectacular geology is worth the trip. Most of the land near St. George is under BLM management, and the hiking trails are clearly marked. At the present time, expect full flowering of desert tobacco, Utah milkvetch, brittlebush (on the Nevada side of Hwy 15), and desert marigold. Later spring flowering is likely three to four weeks away at higher elevations in Zion National Park, about an hour and twenty minutes from St. George. Only a few early flowers are in full swing in Zion, including golden forget-me-not, western wallflower and Draba. A few cactus flowers are just beginning their show, particularly claret cup and mojave prickly pear. There’s plenty to do for plant enthusiasts, and I recommend the free app “Plants of Utah” that includes 3300 species with an easy-to-use artificial key. You’ll want the National Geographic map of Southeastern Utah, as well as one of the many good hiking guidebooks. –Ter Sullivan

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Craig Downer’s 2017 report on 5 wild horse herds and Herd Management Areas in Oregon

Originally posted on Straight from the Horse's Heart:
Source:  The Wild Horse Conspiracy Kiger Mustang HMA, Oregon 10/2017.  Photo copyright Craig C. Downer 2017 Craig C. Downer, wildlife ecologist, has issued a report, including research by Marybeth Devlin, on 5 wild horse herds and Herd Management Areas in Oregon. These include the South Steens HMA, Kiger Mustang HMA, and…

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Bewick’s swans in winter, video

Originally posted on Dear Kitty. Some blog:
https://youtu.be/WkACiW44ZMU This March 2018 video is about Bewick’s swans in icy circumstances in the Lauwersmeer national park in the Netherlands. Wim Bender made the video. Related articles Bewick’s swans migration to England Snow goose, rare in the Netherlands New crab species in the Netherlands Voorne island wildlife videos Good Dutch Bewick?s swans news Dutch geese and swans counted Hobby nest in Leiden, the Netherlands Tapir babies born in Amsterdam zoo Oldest oystercatcher ever in the Netherlands

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Global Warming Has Made Gulf Stream Slowest in 1,600 Years, and That Could Impact Our Weather

Originally posted on The Extinction Chronicles:
By Sean Breslin  weather.com Gulhttps://weather.com/news/news/2018-04-12-gulf-stream-slowing-climate-change-studyf Stream Slowest in 1600 Years Could Cause Changes in Weather Scientists report concerns over a dramatic slowdown in the Gulf Stream, the ocean current that carries water from the tropics toward the North Pole. At a Glance A new study has found the Gulf Stream is circulating at its slowest rate in at least 1,600 years. Climate change is to blame for the slowdown, the study also concluded. If the circulation stops completely, it would have catastrophic impacts on our weather. For years, scientists have studied a spot in the North Atlantic Ocean that has bucked the trend of a warming world. Now, they know what impact this colder-than-average region is having on the Gulf Stream. According to a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature, the Gulf Stream is flowing at its slowest rate in at least 1,600 years, and climate change is the likely culprit. If this slowing trend continues, the researchers fear a shutdown of the Gulf Stream’s circulation is possible in the long-term, and that would have disastrous consequences, bringing rapid sea level rise to the East Coast, more extreme winters to Europe and numerous other side effects. “We know somewhere out there is a tipping point where this current system is likely to break down,” study co-author Stefan Rahmstorf, a climate scientist at Germany’s Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, told the Associated Press. “We still don’t know how far…

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Magic on Wings~

Like the hummers, we have flown away, to a place where wi-fi doesn’t fly. I can’t get a satellite signal consistent enough to upload, here in The Cook Islands. But, I am getting stunning island vistas. Sending Holler Hummer hopes that you are healthy and well, and looking forward to connecting with you when we fly back to civilization. Until…

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