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Climate Change Indicated in Forced Migration of 1.7 Million from Mekong Delta

Originally posted on robertscribbler:
Global sea level rise caused by fossil fuel burning is an issue that is creating worsening impacts to cities, nations, and civilization itself. And according to recent reports out of Vietnam, 1.7 million people have migrated from the low-lying Mekong Delta region over the past decade. Primary causes included climate change and poverty. (Sea level rise…

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Pope warns oil executives: Climate change may ‘destroy civilization’

Originally posted on Exposing the Big Game:
http://thehill.com/policy/energy-environment/391470-pope-warns-oil-executives-climate-change-may-destroy-civilization BY AVERY ANAPOL – 06/09/18   © Getty Images Pope Francis on Saturday issued a dire warning to top oil executives, saying that climate change could “destroy civilization.” At a two-day conference at the Vatican, the pope called climate change a challenge of “epochal proportions,” according to Reuters. He also said that the world must move toward using clean energy and a reduction in the use of fossil fuels. “Civilization requires energy but energy use must not destroy civilization,” Francis said. The conference, organized by the University of Notre Dame in the United States, brought together executives from asset manager BlackRock, BP and Norwegian oil and energy company Equinor, among others. The event was prompted by Francis’s 2015 papal encyclical blaming humans for climate change and criticizing world leaders for not acting swiftly enough to address it. The conference comes a little less than a year after President Trumppulled the U.S. out of the Paris climate accord. Trump has referred to global warming as a “hoax” and drawn criticism from the scientific community for stacking his administration with officials who deny the human role in climate change. During a meeting with Trump, the pope gave him a copy of the encyclical. The pope told the group Saturday that global issues like poverty are “interconnected” to concerns about global warming and access to electricity. “We know that the challenges facing us are interconnected,” he said, according to Reuters. “If we are to eliminate…

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Why Do Turtles Have Shells?

Originally posted on Natural History Wanderings:
ScienceDaily reports Scientists have discovered the real reason turtles have shells. While many thought turtle shells were for protection, new findings show that the shells were actually for digging underground to escape the harsh South African environment where these early proto turtles lived. Read article at Real reason turtles have shells: Burrowing tool: Dr. Tyler Lyson co-authors paper about turtle shells as a burrowing tool, not for protection as previously thought — ScienceDaily

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Urgent: House Appropriations to Vote on BLM Anti-Wild Equine Budget this Wednesday

Originally posted on Straight from the Horse's Heart:
Call to action: The House Appropriations Committee has scheduled its “mark up” on the spending bill for the Interior Department, including the BLM’s Wild Horse & Burro Program, this Wednesday, June 6 starting at 10 am Eastern.     by Carol Walker of Wild Horse Freedom Federation We just learned that Rep. Chris…

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Red spruce comeback in American forests

Originally posted on Dear Kitty. Some blog:
https://youtu.be/fhvVonNUex4 This video from the USA says about itself: Restoring Red Spruce in the Southern Appalachians 10 November 2015 Sue Cameron from the [U.S. Fish and Wildlife] Service’s Asheville Field Office recently joined staff from the Southern Highlands Reserve collecting red spruce cones on Pisgah National Forest, near Mount Mitchell, the highest peak in the Eastern United States. The cone collection is the first step in a multi-year process to restore red spruce to areas where it was found before the extensive logging and burning at the turn of the 20th century. The Southern Appalachians are home to the highest peaks in the eastern United States and red spruce is a key part of the forests on those mountain-top areas. Unfortunately, the amount of red spruce found there today is a fraction of what stood 150 years ago. These forests were decimated by logging, which was followed by intensive fires which burned the thick layer of organic material the spruce needed to re-establish themselves, allowing a northern hardwood forest, with trees like maple and birch, to expand into new areas. The collected cones will be divided among partners who will then extract the seeds and begin growing new trees, which will eventually be planted on public lands where red spruce once grew. Planting efforts will also be focused on connecting patches of red spruce. In addition to helping conserve red spruce trees themselves,…

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The 8 Million Species We Don’t Know

Originally posted on Natural History Wanderings:
The New York Times  reports Paleontologists estimate that before the global spread of humankind the average rate of species extinction was one species per million in each one- to 10-million-year interval. Human activity has driven up the average global rate of extinction to 100 to 1,000 times that baseline rate. The most striking fact about the living environment may be how little we know about it. Even the number of living species can be only roughly calculated. A widely accepted estimate by scientists puts the number at about 10 million. In contrast, those formally described, classified and given two-part Latinized names (Homo sapiens for humans, for example) number slightly more than two million. With only about 20 percent of its species known and 80 percent undiscovered, it is fair to call Earth a little-known planet. Read full story The 8 Million Species We Don’t Know – The New York Times

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