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Lonesome George, other Galápagos tortoises, new research

Originally posted on Dear Kitty. Some blog:
https://youtu.be/gvgZMiqfZ-I This 27 February 2018 video says about itself: Galápagos Tortoise Movement Ecology Programme The film captures the hidden mystery of the lives of giant tortoises, among the longest lived vertebrates on earth. It illustrates the diverse ecological roles played by Galápagos tortoises and how the environment has shaped complex yet predictable patterns on movement, morphology and ecological relationships among tortoises across the Galápagos Archipelago. It demonstrates how a team of conservation biologists developed and implemented a research programme that revealed the hitherto unknown secret lives of Galápagos tortoises – one of the earth’s most iconic wildlife species. It documents the movement ecology of tortoises, their feeding ecology, their role as ecosystem engineers, and their pivotal role in ecosystems. Touching on their conservation history from the time humans discovered the islands, and how humans will determine the fate of tortoises and their habitats. It demonstrates how scientific research can inform conservation management, and highlight the importance of pure and applied research toward understanding and conserving the tortoises and the ecosystems they shape. From Yale University in the USA: In death, Lonesome George reveals why giant tortoises live so long December 3, 2018 Lonesome George’s species may have died with him in 2012, but he and other giant tortoises of the Galápagos are still providing genetic clues to individual longevity through a new study by researchers at Yale University, the University of Oviedo in…

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HUMAN POPULATION GROWTH AND CLIMATE CHANGE

Originally posted on Exposing the Big Game:
https://www.biologicaldiversity.org/programs/population_and_sustainability/climate/?fbclid=IwAR0IVSbh5phNB7dFjcypdp-dA8Y7D_KtQWYFYyrZRZu5xpsWwhCb4Vattec The largest single threat to the ecology and biodiversity of the planet in the decades to come will be global climate disruption due to the buildup of human-generated greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. People around the world are beginning to address the problem by reducing their carbon footprint through less consumption and better technology. But unsustainable human population growth can overwhelm those efforts, leading us to conclude that we not only need smaller footprints, but fewer feet. Portland, Oregon, for example, decreased its combined per-capita residential energy and car driving carbon footprint by 5 percent between 2000 and 2005. During this same period, however, its population grew by 8 percent. A 2009 study of the relationship between population growth and global warming determined that the “carbon legacy” of just one child can produce 20 times more greenhouse gas than a person will save by driving a high-mileage car, recycling, using energy-efficient appliances and light bulbs, etc. Each child born in the United States will add about 9,441 metric tons of carbon dioxide to the carbon legacy of an average parent. The study concludes, “Clearly, the potential savings from reduced reproduction are huge compared to the savings that can be achieved by changes in lifestyle.” One of the study’s authors, Paul Murtaugh, warned that: “In discussions about climate change, we tend to focus on the carbon emissions of an individual over his or her lifetime. Those are…

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