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Petition · Bureau of Land Management: Prevent Oil and Gas Drilling Near The Great Sand Dunes National Park · Change.org

Originally posted on "OUR WORLD":
Prevent Oil and Gas Drilling Near The Great Sand Dunes National Park Brendan Monogue started this petition to Governor John Hickenlooper and 4 others The Great Sand Dunes of Colorado are some of the most unexpected and glorious natural features in the West. Protected within a 150,000 acre national park, the sand dunes…

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BLM seeks public comment of Environmental Analysis for Wild Horse Gather in Southeastern Utah

Originally posted on Straight from the Horse's Heart:
News Release Utah State Office FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 20, 2018 Media Contact: Lisa Reid  (435) 743-3128 BLM seeks public comment of Environmental Analysis for Wild Horse Gather in Southeastern Utah Price, Utah—The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Price Field Office is seeking public comment on an environmental assessment (EA) analyzing a proposed wild horse gather, removal and fertility treatment in the Muddy Creek Herd Management Area (HMA). The Muddy Creek HMA is located in Emery County, approximately 20 miles south of Ferron, Utah, in the San Rafael Swell. It consists of approximately 283,400 acres of public and state lands. The EA analyzes a proposal to gather and remove excess wild horses and apply fertility control between two and four times over a ten-year period. The EA, including maps, is available on ePlanning at: https://eplanning.blm.gov/epl-front- office/eplanning/nepa/nepa_register.do; search for project name “Muddy.” Written comments will be accepted by letter or e-mail until May 20, 2018. Special attention will be given to those comments that contain new technical or scientific information relevant to the proposed action. Comments should be as specific as possible. Comments that contain only opinions or preferences will not receive a formal response but may be considered in the BLM decision-making process. Please reference “Muddy Creek Wild Horse Gather Plan EA” when submitting comments. Written comments may be mailed or e-mailed using the following: Mail BLM Price Field Office Attn:…

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Dinosaur age sea turtle discovery in Alabama, USA

Originally posted on Dear Kitty. Some blog:
From PLOS: New ancestor of modern sea turtles found in Alabama April 18, 2018 A sea turtle discovered in Alabama is a new species from the Late Cretaceous epoch, according to a study published April 18, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Drew Gentry from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Alabama, USA, and colleagues. Modern day sea turtles were previously thought to have had a single ancestor of the Peritresius clade during the Late Cretaceous epoch, from about 100 to 66 million years ago. This ancestral species, Peritresius ornatus, lived exclusively in North America, but few Peritresius fossils from this epoch had been found in what is now the southeastern U.S., an area known for producing large numbers of Late Cretaceous marine turtle fossils. In this study, the research team analyzed sea turtle fossils collected from marine sediments in Alabama and Mississippi, dating from about 83 to 66 million years ago. The researchers identified some of the Alabama fossils as representing a new Peritresius species, which they named Peritresius martini after Mr. George Martin who discovered the fossils. Their identification was based on anatomical features including the shape of the turtle’s shell. Comparing P. martini and P. ornatus, the researchers noted that the shell of P. ornatus is unusual amongst Cretaceous sea turtles in having sculptured skin elements which are well-supplied with blood vessels. This unique feature may suggest that…

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Fossil baleen whale discovery in New Zealand

Originally posted on Dear Kitty. Some blog:
https://youtu.be/95ESNkMT3Zw This video says about itself: 36.4M-Year-Old Fossilized Skeleton May Be Oldest Baleen Whale Relative 12 May 2017 Whale fossil found in Peru is the oldest-known baleen whale relative ever discovered, according to research published May 11 in Current Biology. From the University of Otago in New Zealand: New genus and species of extinct baleen whale identified April 18, 2018 University of Otago palaeontologists are rewriting the history of New Zealand’s ancient whales by describing a previously unknown genus of baleen whale, alive more than 27.5 million years ago and found in the Hakataramea Valley. The new genus and species of extinct baleen whale is based on a skull and associated bones unearthed from the Kokoamu Greensand, a noted fossil-bearing rock unit in the South Canterbury and Waitaki district from the Oligocene period, which extends from about 33.9 million to 23 million years ago. At this time, New Zealand was an archipelago surrounded by shallow, richly productive seas. Former PhD student in the University of Otago’s Department of Geology, Cheng-Hsiu Tsai and his supervisor, Professor Ewan Fordyce, have named the new genus Toipahautea waitaki, which translates in Māori as a baleen-origin whale from the Waitaki region. Professor Fordyce says the discovery is significant in New Zealand’s fossil history. “This is a pretty old whale that goes almost half-way back to the age of the dinosaurs. We are tracking whale history back through time”,…

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