Save The Frogs Day April 28, 2018

Originally posted on Natural History Wanderings:
In an effort to raise awareness of the plight of amphibians, the scientific community has declared Saturday April 28th, 2019  ‘Save The Frogs Day’. On this day we encourage the appreciation and celebration of amphibians by people from all walks of life. Only a small proportion of the public is aware that frogs are disappearing, and amphibian conservation efforts will not be successful with an un-informed public. Our goal is to make the amphibian extinction crisis common knowledge, and Save The Frogs Day is our best way to make this happen! To learn more and find local events go to: Save The Frogs Day

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Saving forest elephants saves forests

Originally posted on Dear Kitty. Some blog:
https://youtu.be/KR0WllmZbPE This 2013 video says about itself: The Dzanga Bai, a small clearing in the Central African Republic, is a unique haven for endangered forest elephants. As many as 200 at a time will gather in this open area to eat minerals found in the soil. The Bai is part of the protected Dzanga-Ndoki National Park, but poachers recently entered the park killing more than two dozen elephants. This video shows elephants enjoying the Bai and reveals efforts to again make it a safe haven for the African forest elephant, a species whose numbers have been reduced by more than 60% in the past decade. From the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in the USA: Protect forest elephants to conserve ecosystems, not DNA April 25, 2018 Although it is erroneously treated as a subspecies, the dwindling African forest elephant is a genetically distinct species. New University of Illinois research has found that forest elephant populations across Central Africa are genetically quite similar to one another. Conserving this critically endangered species across its range is crucial to preserving local plant diversity in Central and West African Afrotropical forests — meaning conservationists could save many species by protecting one. “Forest elephants are the heart of these ecosystems — without them, the system falls apart, and many other species are jeopardized”, said the principal investigator of this research, Alfred…

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Petition · Bureau of Land Management: Prevent Oil and Gas Drilling Near The Great Sand Dunes National Park · Change.org

Originally posted on "OUR WORLD":
Prevent Oil and Gas Drilling Near The Great Sand Dunes National Park Brendan Monogue started this petition to Governor John Hickenlooper and 4 others The Great Sand Dunes of Colorado are some of the most unexpected and glorious natural features in the West. Protected within a 150,000 acre national park, the sand dunes…

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BLM seeks public comment of Environmental Analysis for Wild Horse Gather in Southeastern Utah

Originally posted on Straight from the Horse's Heart:
News Release Utah State Office FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: April 20, 2018 Media Contact: Lisa Reid  (435) 743-3128 BLM seeks public comment of Environmental Analysis for Wild Horse Gather in Southeastern Utah Price, Utah—The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Price Field Office is seeking public comment on an environmental assessment (EA) analyzing a proposed wild horse gather, removal and fertility treatment in the Muddy Creek Herd Management Area (HMA). The Muddy Creek HMA is located in Emery County, approximately 20 miles south of Ferron, Utah, in the San Rafael Swell. It consists of approximately 283,400 acres of public and state lands. The EA analyzes a proposal to gather and remove excess wild horses and apply fertility control between two and four times over a ten-year period. The EA, including maps, is available on ePlanning at: https://eplanning.blm.gov/epl-front- office/eplanning/nepa/nepa_register.do; search for project name “Muddy.” Written comments will be accepted by letter or e-mail until May 20, 2018. Special attention will be given to those comments that contain new technical or scientific information relevant to the proposed action. Comments should be as specific as possible. Comments that contain only opinions or preferences will not receive a formal response but may be considered in the BLM decision-making process. Please reference “Muddy Creek Wild Horse Gather Plan EA” when submitting comments. Written comments may be mailed or e-mailed using the following: Mail BLM Price Field Office Attn:…

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Dinosaur age sea turtle discovery in Alabama, USA

Originally posted on Dear Kitty. Some blog:
From PLOS: New ancestor of modern sea turtles found in Alabama April 18, 2018 A sea turtle discovered in Alabama is a new species from the Late Cretaceous epoch, according to a study published April 18, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Drew Gentry from the University of Alabama at Birmingham, Alabama, USA, and colleagues. Modern day sea turtles were previously thought to have had a single ancestor of the Peritresius clade during the Late Cretaceous epoch, from about 100 to 66 million years ago. This ancestral species, Peritresius ornatus, lived exclusively in North America, but few Peritresius fossils from this epoch had been found in what is now the southeastern U.S., an area known for producing large numbers of Late Cretaceous marine turtle fossils. In this study, the research team analyzed sea turtle fossils collected from marine sediments in Alabama and Mississippi, dating from about 83 to 66 million years ago. The researchers identified some of the Alabama fossils as representing a new Peritresius species, which they named Peritresius martini after Mr. George Martin who discovered the fossils. Their identification was based on anatomical features including the shape of the turtle’s shell. Comparing P. martini and P. ornatus, the researchers noted that the shell of P. ornatus is unusual amongst Cretaceous sea turtles in having sculptured skin elements which are well-supplied with blood vessels. This unique feature may suggest that…

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