Plant evolution and gravity, new research

Originally posted on Dear Kitty. Some blog:
https://youtu.be/lQHo7nlqjsg This October 2016 video, in English with Brazilian Portuguese subtitles, says about itself: Short video explaining a few key facts and concepts on land plant evolution from a phylogenetic perspective. From the Institute of Science and Technology Austria: When plant roots learned to follow gravity Scientists identify key evolutionary steps of gravity-directed root growth August 2, 2019 Summary: Highly developed seed plants evolved deep root systems that are able to sense Earth’s gravity. The ‘how and when’ of this evolutionary step has, until now, remained unknown. Plant biologists have identified crucial components and processes which only developed in seed plants around 350 million years ago to enable fast and efficient gravity-driven root growth. One of the most important events in evolutionary history occurred around 500 million years ago with the spread of plant life from water to land. For plants to thrive in this new environment, root systems had to evolve to grow downwards, following gravity with two primary purposes: anchoring in the soil and providing a source of water and nutrients for growth of the parts of the plant above the ground. This mechanism — called gravitropism — has been extensively studied in flowering plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana. However, it has never been systematically compared throughout the plant kingdom, and its evolutionary origin remains a mystery. Down, down, down — but at different speed Now, Yuzhou Zhang, postdoc in the…

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Humanity’s climate ‘carbon budget’ dwindling fast

Originally posted on Exposing the Big Game:
Marlowe HOOD , https://news.yahoo.com/humanitys-climate-carbon-budget-dwindling-fast-221209437.html AFP•July 17, 2019 1 / 3 The concept of a carbon budget is dead simple: figure out how much CO2 humanity can pump into the atmosphere without pushing Earth’s surface temperature beyond a dangerous threshold The concept of a carbon budget is dead simple: figure out how much CO2 humanity can pump into the atmosphere without pushing Earth’s surface temperature beyond a dangerous threshold (AFP Photo/PATRIK STOLLARZ) More Paris (AFP) – The concept of a carbon budget is dead simple: figure out how much CO2 humanity can pump into the atmosphere without pushing Earth’s surface temperature beyond a dangerous threshold. The 2015 Paris climate treaty enjoins the world to set that bar at “well below” two degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) in order to avoid an upsurge in killer heatwaves, droughts and superstorms made more destructive by rising seas. Last year, the UN’s climate science body concluded this already hard-to-reach goal may not be ambitious enough. Only a 1.5C cap above pre-industrial levels, for example, could prevent the total loss of coral reefs that anchor a quarter of marine life and coastal communities around the globe, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) said in a landmark report. But calculating exactly how much CO2 — produced mainly by burning fossil fuels but also deforestation — we can emit without busting through either of these limits has been deceptively hard to…

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Group Hoping To Get Wolf Reintroduction Measure On 2020 Ballot

Originally posted on Exposing the Big Game:
By Dominic GarciaJuly 9, 2019 at 10:04 pm Filed Under:Colorado News, Wolves https://denver.cbslocal.com/2019/07/09/group-hopes-wolf-reintroduction-measure-2020-ballot/ JACKSON COUNTY, Colo. (CBS4) — A recent sighting of a possibly Gray Wolf in Jackson County has stirred up an old debate about reintroducing wolves to Colorado. Members of The Rocky Mountain Wolf Action Fund are currently gathering signatures to get a measure on the 2020 ballot to do that. (credit: Colorado Parks and Wildlife) “We believe that the right thing to do is give the people of Colorado a voice in restoring the balance,” said Rob Edward, President of the Rocky Mountain Wolf Action Fund. Rob Edward (credit: CBS) Edward says Colorado has the largest elk population in North America and one of the largest deer populations. He adds that without wolves, the two go unchecked and can cause destruction in places like Rocky Mountain National Park. “The elk have stripped the river corridors bare. They’re putting fences around large swaths of the park in order to help the Aspen and willow regenerate. Wolves would change that dynamic over the course of a decade,” Edward told CBS4’s Dominic Garcia. (credit: CBS) But not everyone is excited about the recent wolf sighting. Phillip Anderson is a rancher in Jackson County, where the possible wolf was spotted. He worries about his livestock. “We’re small ranchers and our livelihood depends on keeping the calf and lamb from the point in time it’s born to the time we…

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