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Action Alert! Please Help Sand Wash Basin Wild Horses by Commenting on Roundup Plan and Demanding Water for the Horses

Originally posted on Straight from the Horse's Heart:
Source:  wildhoofbeats.com Water is life, especially for nursing mothers by Carol J. Walker, Dir. of Field Documentation for Wild Horse Freedom Federation The BLM has produced a Determination of NEPA Adequacy instead of an Environmental Assessment for the Sand Wash Basin Herd Management Area and this is a plan that will…

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Young gorillas are working together to destroy poachers’ traps in Rwanda

Originally posted on Exposing the Big Game:
https://matadornetwork.com/read/young-gorillas-working-together-destroy-poachers-traps-rwanda/ Photo: Marian Golovic/Shutterstock Eben Diskin Jun 5, 2018 28,178 WE ALREADY KNOW that humans and gorillas are very alike, but we’ve always believed we could outsmart our distant simian cousins. Poachers, in particular, have tried taking advantage of our cognitive supremacy to trick gorillas, luring them into noose-like traps. But it seems like the gorillas can still outsmart them, thanks to the power of teamwork. Young gorillas living in the Rwanda National Park have reportedly learned how to foil hunters and poachers, working together to dismantle the traps set for them. While older gorillas are usually powerful enough to free themselves, younger ones aren’t so fortunate. Traps usually work by tying a noose to a branch of bamboo stalk, and bending it to the ground, with another stick or rock holding it in place. When triggered, the noose tightens around the animal, even hoisting it into the air if the animal is light enough. Gorillas, however, are taking a proactive approach to these traps. A research teamin Rwanda recently found groups of young gorillas actively seeking out and dismantling traps, to prevent their brethren from falling victim. The research team observed one gorilla bending and breaking the tree, while another disabled the noose, repeating the process for multiple traps. The team believes that gorillas have witnessed a correlation between these devices and the deaths of their peers, prompting their desire to neutralize them. Chris Tyler-Smith, a geneticist at the…

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Barents Sea seems to have crossed a climate tipping point

Originally posted on Exposing the Big Game:
This is probably what a climate tipping point looks like—and we’re past it. JOHN TIMMER – 6/26/2018, 4:00 AM https://arstechnica.com/science/2018/06/barents-sea-seems-to-have-crossed-a-climate-tipping-point/ Enlarge / A cloud-covered Barents Sea, showing sea ice encroaching from the Arctic Ocean to the north. NASA Aqua-MODIS 182 Many of the threats we know are associated with climate change are slow moving. Gradually rising seas, a steady uptick in extreme weather events, and more all mean that change will come gradually to much of the globe. But we also recognize that there can be tipping points, where certain aspects of our climate system shift suddenly to new behaviors. The challenge with tipping points is that they’re often easiest to identify in retrospect. We have some indications that our climate has experienced them in the past, but reconstructing how quickly a system tipped over or the forces that drove the change can be difficult. Now, a team of Norwegian scientists is suggesting it has watched the climate reach a tipping point: the loss of Arctic sea ice has flipped the Barents Sea from acting as a buffer between the Atlantic and Arctic oceans to something closer to an arm of the Atlantic. Decades of data The Norwegian work doesn’t rely on any new breakthrough in technology. Instead, it’s built on the longterm collection of data. The Barents Sea has been monitored for things like temperature, ice cover, and salinity, in some cases extending back over 50…

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Tesla’s Mass Clean Energy Production as Response to Climate Change Surges in June

Originally posted on robertscribbler:
Surging wind, solar, electrical vehicle and battery storage production provide the world with the opportunity to start reducing annual carbon emissions in the near term. And one clean energy leader appears set to break new ground toward achieving that helpful goal. (Tesla appears set to achieve goals, squeeze shorts, and help make clean energy more accessible…

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Sponge-like Cambrian fossil discovery

Originally posted on Dear Kitty. Some blog:
From the University of Leicester in England: Strange sponge-like fossil creature from half a billion years ago June 19, 2018 Summary: A discovery of a new species of sponge-like fossil from the Cambrian Period sheds light on early animal evolution. Scientists have discovered the fossil of an unusual large-bodied sponge-like sea-creature from half a billion years ago. The creature belongs to an obscure and mysterious group of animals known as the chancelloriids, and scientists are unclear about where they fit in the tree of life. They represent a lineage of spiny tube-shaped animals that arose during the Cambrian evolutionary “explosion” but went extinct soon afterwards. In some ways they resemble sponges, a group of simple filter-feeding animals, but many scientists have dismissed the similarities as superficial. The new discovery by a team of scientists from the University of Leicester, the University of Oxford and Yunnan University, China, adds new evidence that could help solve the mystery. The researchers have published their findings in the Royal Society journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The Leicester authors are Tom Harvey, Mark Williams, David Siveter & Sarah Gabbott. The new species, named Allonnia nuda, was discovered in the Chengjiang deposits of Yunnan Province, China. It was surprisingly large in life (perhaps up to 50 cm or more) but had only a few very tiny spines. Its unusual “naked” appearance suggests that further specimens may be…

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