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Urgent: House Appropriations to Vote on BLM Anti-Wild Equine Budget this Wednesday

Originally posted on Straight from the Horse's Heart:
Call to action: The House Appropriations Committee has scheduled its “mark up” on the spending bill for the Interior Department, including the BLM’s Wild Horse & Burro Program, this Wednesday, June 6 starting at 10 am Eastern.     by Carol Walker of Wild Horse Freedom Federation We just learned that Rep. Chris…

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Red spruce comeback in American forests

Originally posted on Dear Kitty. Some blog:
https://youtu.be/fhvVonNUex4 This video from the USA says about itself: Restoring Red Spruce in the Southern Appalachians 10 November 2015 Sue Cameron from the [U.S. Fish and Wildlife] Service’s Asheville Field Office recently joined staff from the Southern Highlands Reserve collecting red spruce cones on Pisgah National Forest, near Mount Mitchell, the highest peak in the Eastern United States. The cone collection is the first step in a multi-year process to restore red spruce to areas where it was found before the extensive logging and burning at the turn of the 20th century. The Southern Appalachians are home to the highest peaks in the eastern United States and red spruce is a key part of the forests on those mountain-top areas. Unfortunately, the amount of red spruce found there today is a fraction of what stood 150 years ago. These forests were decimated by logging, which was followed by intensive fires which burned the thick layer of organic material the spruce needed to re-establish themselves, allowing a northern hardwood forest, with trees like maple and birch, to expand into new areas. The collected cones will be divided among partners who will then extract the seeds and begin growing new trees, which will eventually be planted on public lands where red spruce once grew. Planting efforts will also be focused on connecting patches of red spruce. In addition to helping conserve red spruce trees themselves,…

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The 8 Million Species We Don’t Know

Originally posted on Natural History Wanderings:
The New York Times  reports Paleontologists estimate that before the global spread of humankind the average rate of species extinction was one species per million in each one- to 10-million-year interval. Human activity has driven up the average global rate of extinction to 100 to 1,000 times that baseline rate. The most striking fact about the living environment may be how little we know about it. Even the number of living species can be only roughly calculated. A widely accepted estimate by scientists puts the number at about 10 million. In contrast, those formally described, classified and given two-part Latinized names (Homo sapiens for humans, for example) number slightly more than two million. With only about 20 percent of its species known and 80 percent undiscovered, it is fair to call Earth a little-known planet. Read full story The 8 Million Species We Don’t Know – The New York Times

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